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You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near ') ORDER BY comment_date ASC' at line 3 Effective Communications Can Be As Simple As Taking A Picture Effective Communications Can Be As Simple As Taking A Picture - Article Marketing

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Effective Communications Can Be As Simple As Taking A Picture

By: jessicaadams | Total views: 69 | Word Count: 934 | Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2013 - 9:27 PM

In a recent visit to Washington D.C., I had the honor of viewing our Nation's capital through my camera's viewfinder. I took a tour with a professional photographer who took our small class of six eager students to visit all of the famous sites of D.C.
I quickly learned that the lessons he taught could easily relate to business communications. So travel along with me to learn six tips to improve your message and your photography.
Determine Your Subject
In the first of six tips to connecting business communications and what I learned from the photographer in Washington, DC, we'll start with determining your subject.
Photos: In a photo you want to determine what the focal point of your picture will be. Rarely do we randomly point and click and expect an artistic finished product.
Select your subject and then position them/it in the center of your frame.
Business: This works perfect in business communications. Have you ever read a piece that was "all over the place?" There was a little bit of this and that and at the end of the piece you were confused as to the main theme or subject of the communication.
To clearly communicate your message you need to determine what the subject will be and what the objective of that subject is.
Once you've determined the subject and objective, your communication piece will be clear, in focus and easy to understand.
Example: You would like to send a communication to your customers about a new product that you are offering. Wrapping that product data around several other messages, like an industry update, the staff holiday party and a great recipe for cole slaw, will dilute your message of informing customers about this great new product.
When sending a message - make sure that everything else, from articles to photos, supports your subject.
Focus on the subject - come in CLOSE
Before you hit the shutter button on the camera or the SEND button on your email...come in closer.
Photos: When taking a picture of your loved one focus on the person rather than the building in the background.
In most cases when we are on vacation taking pictures of loved ones in front of famous sites, we step back and take a tiny picture of the person waving in front of the large object. The end result - a photo that isn't really focused on anything CLEARLY.
So come in close - position the person in the left or right corner of the picture - focus on the person with the famous site in the back and slightly blurred. Hey - it's a famous building; we all know what it is, right? So why not focus on the person - crisp, clear and close.
In communications: Same story holds true. You've selected the subject you want to communicate. Say you are writing to your customers/prospects about a new product you have to offer. Don't muddle the message with features or extra information that is unrelated to the topic.
Come in closer: look at the message from the reader's point of view. What problem will this new product solve? How will it make the person's life better? What is the BENEFIT to the customer?
Focus clearly on the benefit and your communication will be crisp, clear and close to the heart of the reader!
The Brain Edits But The Camera Doesn't
The DC photographer, told us that when we look through the camera, our brain edits out the stuff we aren't concentrating on. Then, when we get the picture developed, we find something in the frame that alters the art of the picture.
In Photos: In a picture I took of the Korea Memorial, the 38th Parallel, I was concentrating on the haunted look in the soldier's eye and totally missed the honking big green bus in the background. For me, it ruined the feeling I was trying to capture in the picture.
In Communications: Now think of your business communications. When you have an important message to communicate, make sure you look at it from all angles to ensure there isn't a pesky detail that might alter the tone of your message.
Example: in my previous company we would frequently receive information in our paycheck envelopes. One such message was printed on PINK PAPER. Talk about receiving a "pink slip." My colleagues and I had a hard time getting past the color of the paper to see what the message was.
Another example is the timing of your message. Are you sending out a sensitive message to arrive on a Friday? From the reader's perspective, they will now have to wait the entire weekend to call with questions or for clarification thereby increasing their emotional response.
I'd recommend having someone proofread your message prior to sending to ensure that you haven't missed a detail.
One final story on that subject. In my past company, the president would frequently hold open-door meetings and invite all associates to come and ask company questions. My department would create a flyer announcing the details of the meeting and post them around the building. One such poster was supposed to say "A Message From the President."
Luckily, we proof read everything we sent from our department, and found that the flyer actually read: "A Massage From the President."
Changes the tone of the message a little bit, doesn't it???

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